• Robert E. Harrist, Jr

    JANE AND LEOPOLD SWERGOLD PROFESSOR OF CHINESE ART HISTORY
    COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

    Robert E. Harrist Jr. (Ph.D. Princeton, 1989) has published books and articles on Chinese painting, calligraphy, and gardens, as well as on topics such as replicas in Chinese art, clothing in 20th-century China, and contemporary artists such as Xu Bing. His most recent book, The Landscape of Words, which studies the role of language in shaping perceptions of the natural world, was awarded the Joseph Levenson Prize in 2010. He was Slade Lecturer at Cambridge University in 2007.

  • Matthew McKelway

    DIRECTOR of the MARY GRIGGS BURKE CENTER FOR JAPANESE ART
    TAKEO AND ITSUKO ATSUMI PROFESSOR OF JAPANESE ART HISTORY
    DIRECTOR OF ART HUMANITIES

    Matthew McKelway (Ph.D. Columbia, 1999) specializes in the history of late medieval and early modern Japanese painting. His research on urban representation in rakuchū rakugai zu (screen paintings of Kyoto) has led more broadly to interests in the development of early modern genre painting in depictions of famous places, the early Kabuki theater, and recently Nanban screens. His studies of Kano school fan paintings, individualist painters in 18th century Kyoto, Rimpa painting, and an ongoing study of the painter Nagasawa Rosetsu have explored questions of workshop practices, the materiality and techniques of painting, Sinophilia, and Zen in early modern Japanese art. Professor McKelway has been a guest professor at the Free University of Berlin, University of Heidelberg, Waseda University, and Seijō University.

  • Jonathan Reynolds

    PROFESSOR
    BARNARD COLLEGE
    COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

    Jonathan M. Reynolds (Ph.D. Stanford, 1991) teaches on a wide range of topics in the history of Japanese art and architecture. His research focuses on the history of modern Japanese architecture and Japanese photography. His recently published book, Allegories of Time and Space: Japanese Identity in Photography and Architecture, explores the role of the concept of tradition in the construction of cultural identity in Japanese architecture, photography, and popular culture from the 1940s to the 1990s.

  • Haruo Shirane

    SHINCHO PROFESSOR OF JAPANESE LITERATURE
    Chairman of EALAC

    Professor Haruo Shirane teaches Japanese literature and cultural history, with particular focus on prose fiction, poetry, performative genres (such as storytelling and theater), and visual culture. Shirane is currently interested in the relationship of classical and medieval cultures to early modern and contemporary cultures, looking at issues of gender, manuscript culture, print capitalism, performance and media. His most recent book, Japan and the Culture of the Four Seasons, explored the cultural construction of nature and the environment across a wide spectrum of literature, media, and visual arts from the ancient period to the modern. Shirane is finishing a book called Media, Performance, and Popular Culture: De-Centering Japanese Literature, which recontextualizes Japanese literature in a broader comparative context, focusing on the role of material culture, media, orality, and performance.

    Read Prof. Shirane's full biography on EALAC

  • D. Max Moerman

    PROFESSOR
    BARNARD COLLEGE
    COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

    Max Moerman (Ph. D. Stanford University, 1999) is Professor in the Department of Asian and Middle Eastern Cultures, Barnard College, Columbia University and Co-Chair of the Columbia University Seminar on Buddhist Studies. His research interests lie in the visual and material culture of pre-modern Japanese Buddhism. His publications have examined such topics as the representation of pilgrimage landscapes in painting, literature, and ritual; the burial of sutras and Buddhist images at sites in Northern Kyushu and at the Ise shrines; the death of the Buddha in medieval painting and Edo-period print culture; islands of women in the history of Japanese cartography; narrative and iconographic traditions of lepers and hot springs; woodblock printed talismans used in feudal oaths, economic contracts, and legal disputes; and the history of the Japanese Buddhist world map.