• Talia Andrei

    POST-DOCTORAL FELLOW
    BURKE CENTER FOR JAPANESE ART
    COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 2016

    Talia Andrei’s research focuses on late-medieval Japanese painting and the social, political, and economic context in which it was created. Her dissertation, “Mapping Sacred Spaces: Representations of Pleasure and Worship in sankei mandara” explores the historical and artistic circumstances behind the appearance of sankei mandara (pilgrimage mandalas) in late-medieval Japan and argues that the comparative study of mandara dedicated to a particular sacred site can uncover clues about the mandara’s patronage and power dynamics of local religious institutions. She is currently developing a book project based on this research, and in a forthcoming article she explores the cartographic features of the sankei mandara genre.

  • Miriam Chusid

    POST-DOCTORAL FELLOW
    BURKE CENTER FOR JAPANESE ART
    PRINCETON UNIVERSITY 2016

    Miriam Chusid’s received her Ph.D. from Princeton University in 2016. Her current research focuses on the visual representations of the six paths of existence, or the Buddhist hells and other undesirable realms of the afterlife. Chusid is currently developing a book project that centers on the soteriological role of hell imagery in thirteenth and fourteenth century Japan, and she is particularly interested in the interplay between art, text, and ritual; the use of art and architecture to convey Buddhist knowledge and changes in belief; and the relationship between icons and visual narratives. She is also at work on a second project that examines how Japan’s cultural elite appropriated medieval Buddhist paintings and sculptures to construct a national visual heritage in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.